Home of the Anonykate

itsbetterthananal:

im waiting for the day i can use this as a reaction image and confuse everyone for a good 5-30 seconds before they get it

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pantslesswrock:

kirbystina:

Look at this “Women are too hard to animate” cosplay.

this is fucking brilliant

pantslesswrock:

kirbystina:

Look at this “Women are too hard to animate” cosplay.

this is fucking brilliant

WHEN ONE IS EXPECTING

evil-bones-mccoy:

imyourdestinymotherfucker:

Today, I bought this book (for my sister, lets clarify that now ‘cause the only way I’m going anywhere near sperm is if I fall into a vat of it):

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BUT WAIT

THIS:

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IS:

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SOME:

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OF THE BRILLIANT:

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STUFF IT HAS IN IT:

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the last one. 

i could make a comment about the ides of march, but…

peppybuns:

and there it is.
click for high res

peppybuns:

and there it is.

click for high res

otaku-4-life:

awesomephilia:

"big boobs don’t count if you’re fat"

neither does a big dick if half of it is your personality

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lithefider:

asutori:

Cecil’s birthmarks changes shape and movement with his emotions - they flare up when he’s flustered or angry, hide under clothing when he’s scared or embarrassed, move rapidly when he’s excited, softer shapes for good feelings and rougher shapes for bad ones etc.

He’s kinda self-conscious about them since it’s like wearing your heart on your sleeve, but Carlos thinks they’re pretty (and also scientifically fascinating).

Move-y tattoo/skin Cecil makes me think of an octopus skin as it reacts with mood, which you KNOW I am 500% okay with.  UuU

theking-and-hislionheart:

kelseytvs:

revoltingnaughtynewsie:

animalbks:

tony-wiseau:

If you don’t like Elizabeth Swann you’re wrong.

Keira Knightley was 17 there

REALLY?!

Yup Keira was 16/17 for the filming of the first Pirates movie and here I am at 20, and all I’ve done today is study chemistry, eat cookies and cry a lot.

i stopped loving her when shE BURNT TH FUCKING RUM

So she showed up, a little late, but I’m pleased she showed at all. We talked, watched Lucy (Which I enjoyed a lot more than i thought I would, but I agree with the post floating around about its problematic elements) And we got to talk about teh FB post that spawned all this.

She calls it, not her most shining moment. And explained that she hadn’t meant to be hurtful and she knows people out there care about her, but in the heat of the moment that was what she felt. And she doesn’t regret it because it got her what she wanted. Out of her house and not alone. Which I can respect, even if I don’t appreciate it.

This has been your window into the Annonykate’s life.

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION